Tangled

Tangled will be the newest Disney movie. It will be the 50th animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, planned for release on November 24, 2010. The story is loosely based on the classic German fairy tale Rapunzel by the Brothers Grimm.

The movie’s visual style will be based on the painting “The Swing”, by the French Rococo artist Jean-Honoré Fragonard.

Disney’s previous animated feature The Princess and the Frog in 2009, although being highly critically acclaimed and taking in nearly $270 million worldwide, was not as successful as Disney had hoped. Disney expressed the belief that the film’s emphasis on princesses may have deterred young boys from seeing the film. In order to market the film to both boys and girls, Disney changed the film’s name from Rapunzel to Tangled, while also emphasizing Flynn Rider, the film’s prominent male character. Disney was criticized for altering the classic title and story as a marketing strategy. Floyd Norman, a retired Disney and Pixar animator, said, “I’m convinced they’ll gain nothing from this except the public seeing Disney as desperately trying to find an audience.”

Legend of Korra

Fans of Avatar: the Last Airbender yesterday rejoiced with the announcement of “Legend of Korra” which will be the sequel to the original series. The series takes place 70 years after Avatar: The Last Airbender. Korra is the next Avatar after Aang, “a passionate, rebellious, and fearless teenaged girl” who is hotheaded, independent and “ready to take on the world”. Korra comes from the Southern Water Tribe, and Aang and Katara’s daughter Tenzin is her Airbending teacher. One of the story’s settings is Republic City, a “metropolis powered by steampunk-type technology,” “inhabited by people from all nations.” Here Korra must deal with rampant crime and an anti-bender revolt.

Although the creators of the show had planned an ending to the show, the success of Avatar: The Last Airbender caused Nickelodeon to ask for more episodes. The creators then came out with this new idea of the next Avatar, this time a girl named Korra. They decided upon a female Avatar after the large audience of females of the original show, and felt it was time to have a big action franchise with a female in the lead instead of the traditional male role.

The show will be darker and more mature than the original show, though the creators are not trying to target a new audience (saying the original was filled with adult themes), with more mature themes, but will also try to balance it out with a similar sense of fun and adventure of the original series.

So, I can say I’m very VERY excited about this! I am a big fan of Avatar: The Last Airbender, and I’m sure the Republic city will be very interesting since I guess the water and fire nations along with the metal-bending of the earth nation will come together. And the non-bending revolt must be very interesting. Rumor has it that “Aang is featured in the series in the Spirit World, as Roku and past Avatars were to Aang in the Last Airbender.”, and if this is true, that is very sad because in the end of the original series, Aang was only what, twelve? So, 70 years later he is supposed to be like 82, but he dies much longer before that because Korra is a young woman. Remember, the Avatar ability is passed after the previous Avatar dies. So that is very sad. I wonder if we will see any of the older characters, I really hope that Toph and Katara are alive. I’m sure Iroh is dead already though, and that is one of the saddest things too because I really did love him as a character. Interestingly enough, we know that Aang and Katara’s daughter Tenzin will be Korra’s Airbending teacher… So at least airbending is not dead? There are a lot of things we don’t know yet, so bring on the theories! I hope this will be as good as – or even better than the first series!

Shoes!

Inspired from toxel’s post and designboom. Seeing all these shoes make me want to go shopping!

First pair designed by Chau Her Lee.

Shoe designed by Chau Har Lee, this shoe doesn't have an ordinary heel if you haven't noticed.

Sandals by Yarel Yair Design Studio.

A wooden summer sandal, inspired by the Japanese sandal, with an innovative fresh look , made from natural materials, lightweight and airy. Made from wood, steel and leather. By Yarel Yair Design Studio.

And now, the hoof shoe craze, started by Iris Shieferstein!

'vegas girl' by german artist iris schieferstein, 2009 toy pistol, cow hooves, zipper

Taken from Shieferstein’s website: “For many years, Iris Schieferstein has worked with dead animals as raw material for her pieces of art. She joins the fragments together to new creatures and thus gives a new face to death. No matter, if her arrangements follow paintings of the great masters of art or if the joined objects turn out to be whole words – her work always gives evidence of aesthetic intutition and her inclination to subtle enterntainment.The earlier you die – the longer you are dead.”

Interesting point of view, and I don’t like how dead animals are used, but if you think about it, we all wear shoes made from leather all the time – taken from dead animals brutally. So I guess this isn’t that bad after all.

iris schieferstein, 2005

girl wearing martin margiela hoof shoes

By the way, Martin Margiela’s website is awesome and it’s NOT under construction!

other hoof shoes by martin margiela, apparently, he has them for all seasons.

And skeletal stilettos by dsquared2! I loved the entire series.

Aand, one of my favorites of all time, Liam Fahy‘s Stormtrooper stilettos, that won him the Fashion Fringe Shoe competition, bagging him a paid internship with Rupert Sanderson.

Last but not least, an interesting interactive shoe that works through an iPhone app, “SHORT ++” (or robotic elevator shoes), created by Adi Marom.

Umbrellas for the Civil but Discontent Man

Lovely products, funny – and probably true – name. Found the “Umbrella Samurai” from one of my good friend Ceyhun’s blog. The other umbrellas are nice too. My favorite is the one on the left of the picture in the middle. (although I don’t think that that one is for sale – pout). Designed by Materious (purchase information is also available on their website).

“In Civilization and Its Discontents, Sigmund Freud contends that aggressiveness is a fundamental human instinct whose inhibition is a necessary obligation of social life:

“Men are not gentle, friendly creatures wishing for love, who simply defend themselves if they are attacked, but that a powerful measure of desire for aggression has to be reckoned as part of their instinctual endowment.”

Fundamentally there is a tension between the freedom to gratify these natural desires and the conformity demanded by civilization.  What results is a muted, guilty, and ultimately a discontent populous in which the possibility of a more complete happiness has been traded for a degree of security.

Umbrellas for the Civil but Discontent Man combines a symbol of gentlemanly refinement—the full-sized, dark umbrella—with an element of more manly sword-bearing times.  The umbrellas offer brief psychological respite from the dictates of social amiability; aggressive fantasies are allowed and encouraged on the daily commute to the office.  The effete civilian’s grasp of the handle takes him into the world of the masterful samurai, the medieval barbarian, or the triumphant cavalryman.”

Guy Harvey

While zapping on the TV with my sister, we came across a news report about Guy Harvey, who was painting an sword fish with watercolors. At first I thought he was an artist very talented in using watercolors, but turns out that he was a scientist and a businessman as well. He is currently working on raising fund to save the gulf after the BP disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.

“Guy Harvey is a unique blend of artist, scientist, diver, angler, conservationist and explorer, fiercely devoted to his family and his love of the sea. Growing up in Jamaica, Guy spent many hours fishing and diving with his father along the Island’s south coast. He was obsessed with the creatures of the sea and began drawing pictures of the many different fish he observed.Guy’s artwork can be found in art exhibits, stores, galleries, restaurants and at fishing tournaments. He makes appearances at store openings as well as public appearances for a variety of environmental causes.

Born in Lippspringe, Germany on September 16, 1955 while his father was serving as a Gunnery Officer in the British Army, Guy is a 10th generation Jamaican of English heritage as his family immigrated to Jamaica in 1664. From his early inspirations, Guy’s natural gift to recreate marine life has propelled him from Professor of Marine Biology to a Wildlife Artist and Photographer. Guy initially opted for a scientific education, earning high honors in Marine Biology at Aberdeen University in Scotland in 1977. He continued his formal training at the University of West Indies, where he obtained a Doctorate in Fisheries Management.

In 1985, he depicted Ernest Hemingway’s famous fishing story “The Old Man & the Sea” through a series of 44 original pen and ink drawings and displayed them at an exhibition in Jamaica. Based on the positive response he received at the show, Guy began painting full time and by 1988 was providing custom artwork for use on a variety of products. Guy began to travel the world to gain more knowledge of the habits and activities of marine wildlife. He became an avid scuba diver and skilled underwater photographer. He pioneered a technique of diving and photographing free-swimming billfish. His personal observations made during these diving expeditions have better enabled him to capture the detail in his paintings that contributes to the popularity of his work.

A passion for the beauty and wonder of the underwater world has driven Dr. Guy Harvey to be a leading conservationist and advocate for the protection of our environment. Guy dedicates much of his talent, time and resources to programs that protect our oceans, fish population and reef systems. The Guy Harvey Research Institute at Nova Southeastern University and The Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation have taken on a leadership role in providing the scientific information necessary to understand and protect the world’s fish resources and biodiversity from continued decline.”

Glimpse by Sarah Tamala Kang

Nice idea, made me smile.

Sometimes we cannot help but to try and catch a glimpse of the otherside.

Passing through the everyday spaces we inhibit, the door half opened always stirs up a sense of seduction and curiosity within us. Inspired by these ordinary yet inexplicable moments in our daily lives, I designed a mirror that gives an illusion of a door opening on any given surface.” is the description of Glimpse. Check out other works from Sarah Tamala Kang on her website.


Update from my life + Pera Museum

Lately I have been busy with my internship in a printing house. It’s a nice place hidden in a queer neighborhood, the place is in the middle of the city but nobody really knew how to get there and I got lost 4 times on my second day (the first day I had hired a cab) but well, when you learn how to get there the rest is easy. Oh and I have learned a lot from my internship so far.

Last weekend I went to the Botero exhibition in the Pera Museum with my mother, and it was quite interesting but not as interesting as the exhibitions downstairs from the Suna and İnan Kıraç collection. One was of the panaromas of İstanbul and other nice portraits of women and royal life. There was also a replica of the Tamer of tortoises (Kaplumbağa Terbiyecisi) which my mother took a liking to since she first saw its photo many years ago. The other exhibition was of the various types of weighing systems, and there were a lot of weights from Roman Antiquity to Byzantium period weights to Ottoman then modern weights and so, there was one shaped like the head of Heracles (or Hercules), another looking  like a 12-sided die which we use to play FRP and much more. There was also a pretty sundial which I liked, and next time I’ll be sure to bring my camera with me, because they were so pretty ^^

By the way, entering the Pera Museum is only 3 liras for students and 5 liras per person for other people. So it’s quite cheap and worth paying for to see those wonderful collections.