VA 401-402 Proposal Draft

Fourth draft of my project proposal for VA 401-402

Project Proposal Draft 4

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key events in the history of computing

Here is the booklet I designed for the subject of key events in the history of computing. Made for my advanced typography class, VA 424, originally derived from the subject of a course I had taken in the Spring term of 2007-2008, Murat Germen‘s VA 210, introduction to multimedia. Here are some of the sample pages from the booklet (click on them to view larger) and you could download the whole PDF from here

Project Proposal for VA 401-402

So here is the more detailed version of my project proposal that I have posted on my drupal blog created for VA 401-402 (which is my senior year project studio course). I will try update my wordpress blog about the project too, since I don’t really like posting on drupal yet. Here is the link for the more detailed proposal (which is still incomplete at the moment)

Project Proposal_detailed

Grid sample exercise for VA 302

I’m really not sure where this will go, but the first homework from VA 302, my new Project Studio course, is making 8 grid layouts as a proposal for the menu left over from the VA 301 course.

So, while doing these I realized I use a very strict grid, which is not something I really like, but I am not sure how being random will be suitable for the Çubuk Chinese restaurant menu, so I tried to use the grid instead of breaking away.

I was mainly influenced by Chinese screens and screen doors, so some of these might seem too simple, but that was deliberate. My favorite is the 3rd from the top on the left side, because that was my – in my opinion – most successful attempt in making something that could be used in a menu, applies to the grid, has clear hierarchy and moreover has a look like a Chinese screen.

Moving on.

Left side

First from the top:

The most simple layout I made. The middle square has the most hierarchy, so the most important food – like main dishes – would have to be written there. The left and right panel have more or less the same importance. The upper and lower rectangles are meant for photographs of delicious-looking dishes of Chinese food.

Second from top:

I initially thought this like a featured specials page because it looks quite simple and will only require photo and text of the specials that are recommended by the chef with their slightly lowered price. The page is promptly divided in three to feature appetizers, main dishes and desserts seperately.

Third from top:

Thought as the main page of the menu – I mentioned this above. Normally the eye traces a menu from the middle, then top right, and later left, so I think this should contain most of the information on the menu. Main courses smack in the middle, upper right noodles and rice, below that menus and desserts, left side appetizers, soup and so on.

Bottom:

I thought this page as a menu and beverages page, the checkered-like part could contain one photo that is only visible from where the boxes are, or individual photos of menus, right side contains different menus. The left side would be a long list of beverages.

Right side

First from the top:

Photo – text page. Each box which contain a pair of horizontal or a pair of verticals have one box of text and one box of photography. I think illustrations will do better, because considering this is a menu, the group of text will signify a group of food.

Second from top:

This is a more flexible layout since it has both square and rectangle parts. The four squares on the upper right side should contain photography so that the eye trail would linger on them before moving to the upper middle part.

Third from top:

Simplistic layout for take-out menu. Looks more friendly because of the space between the elements. Critical information such as address and telephone numbers should be on the bottom right where the emphasis is maximized.

Bottom:

Thought exactly like the second from top on the right side, but with chunkier boxes of text.

Seeing, looking and Frutiger

They say that seeing and looking have entirely different meanings. You might at first agree and continue on, but if you do so then you miss the big picture. What exactly does one see when you look at a simple wooden door? I used to see faces and horses on the door of one of the old wardrobes at home when I was about four. So why do simple things evoke something that is entirely different than the initial? We do associate simple shapes or patches of a spilt juice to things quite distinct. Yesterday in class (VA 301 – Project Studio I), we watched a short documentary about Adrian Frutiger, a renowned typeface designer, and in some part of the documentary it was shown how Frutiger transmits something out of nature into artwork with simple black and white shapes. I think it might be one of the best ways of understanding how somebody sees while looking.

Patterns like Frutiger’s, of course, are very simple to understand because you somehow know what the shapes talk about. However, if the question “what do you see when you look at this?” is also asked in a psychologists’ room, while a Rorschach test is taking place. Think about it, some person who shows you a bunch of pictures can tell what kind of the person you are deep inside if they listen to what you associate the pictures to. So why not try getting to know yourself better in the first place? I say we should keep associating things with each other, putting aside our grown-up minds once in a while, like that one time you lay back and gazed at the clouds, saying that the one on the right looked like a bunny. Because I think that is the only way we will keep seeing what we look at.

A legible sans that Frutiger designed, originally created for use on signage at Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris.

A legible sans that Frutiger designed, originally created for use on signage at Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris.

A sample rorschach ink test

A sample rorschach ink test